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Changes in the physical activity of acute stroke survivors between inpatient and community living with early supported discharge : an observational cohort study

Kerr, A. and Rowe, P. and Esson, D. and Barber, M. (2016) Changes in the physical activity of acute stroke survivors between inpatient and community living with early supported discharge : an observational cohort study. Physiotherapy, 102 (4). pp. 327-331. ISSN 0031-9406

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Abstract

Th abstract objective is to describe and compare patterns of physical activity among stroke survivors during their hospital stay and community living with early supported discharge.  Observational cohort study of physical activity before and after early supported discharge.  UK National Health Service stroke units and participants’ homes.Participants Forty-one stroke survivors, aged 69 (standard deviation 11) years, with a median Modified Rivermead Mobility Index of 33.5 [interquartile range (IQR) 25.8 to 35.3].  The primary outcome measures were time spent in sitting/standing/walking and number of steps taken, as recorded by a physical activity monitor.  There were statistical differences (P<0.001) for all categories of physical activity.After early supported discharge to the community, participants took more than twice the number of steps [median 842 (IQR 1110) vs 2260 (IQR 3459] and spent more than double the time in standing [median 102 (IQR 124) minutes vs 196 (IQR 219) minutes] compared with their hospital stay.  Community living with early supported discharge promoted higher levels of physical activity in medically stable stroke survivors. The near-doubling of activity may serve as a guideline for what is achievable during stroke rehabilitation.