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Metal-Packaged fibre Bragg grating strain sensors for surface mounting onto spalled concrete wind turbine foundations

Perry, M. and Fusiek, G. and McKeeman, I. and Niewczas, P. and Saafi, M. (2015) Metal-Packaged fibre Bragg grating strain sensors for surface mounting onto spalled concrete wind turbine foundations. In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. SPIE. ISBN 9781628418392

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Abstract

In this work, we demonstrate preliminary results for a hermetically sealed, metal-packaged fibre Bragg grating strain sensor for monitoring existing concrete wind turbine foundations. As the sensor is bolted to the sub-surface of the concrete, it is suitable for mounting onto uneven, wet and degraded surfaces, which may be found in buried foundations. The sensor was able to provide reliable measurements of concrete beam strain during cyclic three- And four- point bend tests. The strain sensitivity of the prototype sensor is currently 10 % of that of commercial, epoxied fibre strain sensors.