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Technological memory aid use by people with acquired brain injury

Jamieson, Matthew and Cullen, Breda and McGee-Lennon, Marilyn and Brewster, Stephen and Evans, Jonathan (2015) Technological memory aid use by people with acquired brain injury. Neuropsychological rehabilitation. ISSN 0960-2011

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Abstract

Evans, Wilson, Needham, and Brentnall (2003) investigated memory aid use by people with acquired brain injury (ABI) and found little use of technological memory aids. The present study aims to investigate use of technological and other memory aids and strategies 10 years on, and investigate what predicts use. People with ABI and self-reported memory impairments (n = 81) completed a survey containing a memory aid checklist, demographic questions and memory questionnaires. Chi-square analysis showed that 10 of 18 memory aids and strategies were used by significantly more people in the current sample than in Evans et al. (2003). The most commonly used strategies were leaving things in noticeable places (86%) and mental retracing of steps (77%). The most commonly used memory aids were asking someone to remind you (78%), diaries (77%), lists (78%), and calendars (79%) and the most common technologies used were mobile phone reminders (38%) and alarms/timers (38%). Younger people who used more technology prior to their injury and who use more non-technological memory aids currently were more likely to use technology. Younger people who used more memory aids and strategies prior to their injury and who rated their memory as poorer were more likely to use all types of memory aids and strategies.