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Synthesis and physical property evaluation of a series of poly(N-2-pyridylmethyl methacrylamide-co-methyl methacrylate)s and related polymers

Stolbova, M. and Hudson, N.E. and Pethrick, R.A. and Sherrington, D.C. and Slark, A. (2005) Synthesis and physical property evaluation of a series of poly(N-2-pyridylmethyl methacrylamide-co-methyl methacrylate)s and related polymers. Journal of Macromolecular Science B: Physics, 44 (6). pp. 941-965. ISSN 0022-2348

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Abstract

The synthesis and physical properties of a series of poly(N-2-pyridylmethyl methacrylamide-co-methyl methacrylate)s and related copolymers is presented. High yields of the copolymers were obtained starting from copolymers of methacryloyl chloride with methyl methacrylate, which reacted almost quantitatively with 2-pyridylmethylamine or a related amine, to give copolymers that are capable of interpolymer chain hydrogen bonding. Copolymers of (N-2-pyridylmethylmethacrylamide) (PyMeMA) were obtained in high yield and investigated in detail. The variation in the molar mass data obtained using different methods was interpreted as being a consequence of solvent-induced aggregation effects. Examination of the solution properties indicated that the polymers are indeed able to form transient aggregates through hydrogen bonding interactions that, when subject to shear, separate into smaller aggregates or individual polymer chains. These hydrogen bond interactions are also evident in the solid state physical properties as observed in variation of the glass transition temperature, but to a lesser extent than they are in the dynamic mechanical analysis. Adhesion measurements once more indicate the potential of these materials to exhibit enhanced properties as a consequence of hydrogen bonding interactions.