Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Architecture, Voltage and Components for a Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Electric Grid

Armstrong, Michael J. and Blackwelder, Mark and Bollman, Andrew and Ross, Christine and Campbell, Angela and Jones, Catherine and Norman, Patrick (2015) Architecture, Voltage and Components for a Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Electric Grid. [Report]

[img]
Preview
Text (Armstrong-etal-NASA-CR-2015-Architecture-voltage-and-components-for-a-turboelectric-distributed-propulsion)
Armstrong_etal_NASA_CR_2015_Architecture_voltage_and_components_for_a_turboelectric_distributed_propulsion.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (12MB) | Preview

Abstract

The development of a wholly superconducting turboelectric distributed propulsion system presents hide unique opportunities for the aerospace industry. However, this transition from normally conducting systems to superconducting systems significantly increases the equipment complexity necessary to manage the electrical power systems. Due to the low technology readiness level (TRL) nature of all components and systems, current Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) technology developments are driven by an ambiguous set of system-level electrical integration standards for an airborne microgrid system (Figure 1). While multiple decades' worth of advancements are still required for concept realization, current system-level studies are necessary to focus the technology development, target specific technological shortcomings, and enable accurate prediction of concept feasibility and viability. An understanding of the performance sensitivity to operating voltages and an early definition of advantageous voltage regulation standards for unconventional airborne microgrids will allow for more accurate targeting of technology development. Propulsive power-rated microgrid systems necessitate the introduction of new aircraft distribution system voltage standards. All protection, distribution, control, power conversion, generation, and cryocooling equipment are affected by voltage regulation standards. Information on the desired operating voltage and voltage regulation is required to determine nominal and maximum currents for sizing distribution and fault isolation equipment, developing machine topologies and machine controls, and the physical attributes of all component shielding and insulation. Voltage impacts many components and system performance.