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CE 2004: Computer engineering: curriculum guidelines for undergraduate degree programmes in computer engineering

Shackelford, R. and Cross, J. and Davies, G. and Impagliazzo, J. and Kamali, R. and LeBlanc, R. and Lunt, B. and McGettrick, A.D. and Sloan, R. and Topi, H. (2004) CE 2004: Computer engineering: curriculum guidelines for undergraduate degree programmes in computer engineering. IEEE.

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Computer engineering as an academic field encompasses the broad areas of computer science and electrical engineering. Computer engineering is defined in this report as follows. Computer engineering is a discipline that embodies the science and technology of design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of software and hardware components of modern computing systems and computer-controlled equipment. Computer engineering has traditionally been viewed as a combination of both computer science (CS) and electrical engineering (EE). Hence, this unique combination prepares students for careers that deal with computer systems from design through implementation. Computing systems are components of a wide range of products such as fuel injection systems in vehicles, medical devices such as x-ray machines, communication devices such as cell phones, and household devices such as alarm systems and washing machines. Designing computing systems and computing components of products, developing and testing their prototypes, and implementing them to market are examples of what computer engineers would do.