Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Pulsed electric field treatment on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different waveforms

Qin, S. and Timoshkin, I. V. and MacLean, M. and Wilson, M. P. and Given, M. J. and Wang, T. and Anderson, J. G. and MacGregor, S. J. (2015) Pulsed electric field treatment on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different waveforms. IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation, 22 (4). pp. 1841-1848. ISSN 1070-9878

[img]
Preview
Text (Qin-etal-TDEI2015-pulsed-electric-field-treatment-of-saccharomyces-cerevisiae)
Qin_etal_TDEI2015_pulsed_electric_field_treatment_of_saccharomyces_cerevisiae.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (858kB) | Preview

Abstract

Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment can be used for non-thermal inactivation of microorganisms. The aim of this paper is to investigate PEF treatment of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using three different field waveforms: square; non-oscillating exponential and oscillating exponential. The PEF system used in this paper consists of a pulsed power supply and a parallel-plane metallic electrodes treatment cell located in an air-pressurised chamber. PEF treatment of the yeast was conducted using electric field impulses with magnitudes of 67 kV/cm and 80 kV/cm. The efficacy of the PEF treatment for inactivation of the yeast cells was assessed by comparison of the PEF-treated and untreated yeast populations. Results showed that 3-log10 reduction in the yeast population can be achieved with 100 impulses using all tested waveforms. Amongst all three tested waveforms non-oscillating exponential impulses demonstrated improved PEF performance. The effect of duration of treatment and peak magnitude of the field on the PEF process is discussed.