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A simple photoacoustic method for the in-situ study of soot distribution in flames

Humphries, G. S. and Dunn, J. and Hossain, M. M. and Lengden, M. and Burns, I. S. and Black, J. D. (2015) A simple photoacoustic method for the in-situ study of soot distribution in flames. Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics, 119 (4). pp. 709-715. ISSN 0946-2171

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Abstract

This paper presents a simple photoacoustic technique capable of quantifying soot volume fraction across a range of flame conditions. The output of a high-power (30 W) 808 nm cw-diode laser was modulated in order to generate an acoustic pressure wave via laser heating of soot within the flame. The generated pressure wave was detected using a micro electro-mechanical (MEMS) microphone mounted close to a porous-plug flat-flame burner. Measurements were obtained using the photoacoustic technique in flames of three different equivalence ratios and were compared to laser induced incandescence (LII). The results presented here show good agreement between the two techniques and show the potential of the photoacoustic method as a way to measure soot volume fraction profiles in this type of flame. We discuss the potential to implement this technique with much lower laser power than was used in the experiments presented here.