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How the smartphone is driving the eye-health imaging revolution

Bolster, Nigel M and Giardini, Mario E and Livingstone, Iain AT and Bastawrous, Andrew (2014) How the smartphone is driving the eye-health imaging revolution. Expert Review of Ophthalmology, 9 (6). pp. 475-485. ISSN 1746-9899

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Abstract

The digitization of ophthalmic images has opened up a number of exciting possibilities within eye care such as automated pathology detection, as well as electronic storage and transmission. However, technology capable of capturing digital ophthalmic images remains expensive. We review the latest progress in creating ophthalmic imaging devices based around smartphones, which are readily available to most practicing ophthalmologists and other medical professionals. If successfully developed to be inexpensive and to offer high-quality imaging capabilities, these devices will have huge potential for disease detection and reduction of preventable blindness across the globe. We discuss the specific implications of such devices in high-, middle-and low-income settings.