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Impact of C2C Operation on DG Capacity in HV Networks

Blair, Steven Macpherson and Booth, Campbell (2014) Impact of C2C Operation on DG Capacity in HV Networks. Working paper. University of Strathclyde.

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Abstract

The objective of the Capacity to Customers (C2C) project, an Ofgem Low Carbon Network Fund project led by Electricity North West Limited (ENWL) in conjunction with several industrial and academic partners, is to test a combination of new automation technology, non-conventional network operational practices (i.e., increased network interconnection), and commercial demand-side response (DSR) contracts. These changes will allow ENWL to increase demand and generation connections on a selection of trial circuits – representing approximately 10% of its high voltage (HV) system – without resorting to conventional reinforcement measures. The project will thereby “release” inherent spare capacity in the HV system in order to accommodate the future forecast increases in demand and DG, whilst avoiding (or deferring) the cost and environmental impacts that are associated with traditional network reinforcement. This paper documents work undertaken by the University of Strathclyde to quantify the ability of C2C network operation to accommodate additional DG capacity. This has been achieved using simulation models based upon actual system data from a representative proportion of the C2C trial circuits.