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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Modified fuzzy c-means clustering for automatic tongue base tumour extraction from MRI data

Doshi, Trushali and Soraghan, John and Grose, Derek and MacKenzie, Kenneth and Petropoulakis, Lykourgos (2014) Modified fuzzy c-means clustering for automatic tongue base tumour extraction from MRI data. In: 2014 Proceedings of the 22nd European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO). IEEE, 2460 - 2464. ISBN 9780992862619

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Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging modality to extract tumour regions to assist in radiotherapy and surgery planning. Extraction of a tongue base tumour from MRI is challenging due to variability in its shape, size, intensities and fuzzy boundaries. This paper presents a new automatic algorithm that is shown to be able to extract tongue base tumour from gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1+Gd) MRI slices. In this algorithm, knowledge of tumour location is added to the objective function of standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) to extract the tumour region. Experimental results on 9 real MRI slices demonstrate that there is good agreement between manual and automatic extraction results with dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.77±0.08.