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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Analysis of short-term solar radiation data

Vijayakumar, G. and Kummert, M. and Klein, S.A. and Beckman, W.A. (2005) Analysis of short-term solar radiation data. Solar Energy, 79 (5). pp. 495-504. ISSN 0038-092X

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Abstract

Solar radiation data are available for many locations on an hourly basis. Simulation studies of solar energy systems have generally used these hourly values to estimate long-term annual performance, although solar radiation can exhibit wide variations during an hour. Variations in solar radiation during an hour, such as on a minute basis, could result in inaccurate performance estimates for systems that respond quickly and non-linearly to solar radiation. In addition, diffuse fraction regressions and cumulative frequency distribution curves have been developed using hourly data and the accuracy of these regressions when applied to short-term radiation has not been established. The purpose of this research is to investigate the inaccuracies caused by using hourly rather than short-term (i.e., minute and 3 min) radiation data on the estimated performance of solar energy systems. The inaccuracies are determined by examination of the frequency distribution and diffuse fraction relationships for short-term solar radiation data as compared to existing regressions and by comparing calculated radiation on tilted surfaces and utilizability based on hourly and short-term radiation data.