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Elastic stress concentration at radial crossholes in pressurised thick cylinders

Comlekci, T. and Mackenzie, D. and Hamilton, R. and Wood, J. (2007) Elastic stress concentration at radial crossholes in pressurised thick cylinders. Journal of Strain Analysis for Engineering Design, 42 (6). pp. 461-468. ISSN 0309-3247

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Abstract

Results of a parametric finite element analysis investigation of stress concentration at radial crossholes in pressurized cylinders are presented in numerical and graphical form. The analysis shows that the location of maximum stress does not generally occur at the junction between the bores, as is commonly supposed, but at some small distance up the crosshole from the junction. Maximum stress concentration factors (SCFs) are defined on the basis of the maximum principal stress, von Mises equivalent stress, and stress intensity. Three-dimensional plots of the SCF against the cylinder radius ratio b/a and the crosshole-to-main-bore-radius ratio c/a are presented. The SCFs were found to vary across the range of geometries considered with local minima identified within the parameter range in most cases. The results therefore allow designers to select optimum b/a and c/a ratios to minimize stress concentration in real problems.