Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

High-resolution Burnett simulations of micro Couette flow and heat transfer

Lockerby, Duncan A. and Reese, J.M. (2003) High-resolution Burnett simulations of micro Couette flow and heat transfer. Journal of Computational Physics, 188 (2). pp. 333-347. ISSN 0021-9991

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

A high-order continuum model for micro-scale flows is investigated. The Burnett equations are applied to the steady-state micro Couette flow of a Maxwellian monatomic gas. Solutions to these equations are shown to be stable for all Knudsen numbers (Kn) up to the limit of the equations' validity (Kn→1). The reason why previous researchers have failed to obtain solutions to this problem for Kn much greater than 0.1 is explained. A procedure is proposed to overcome these difficulties, and its application successfully demonstrated. Results are obtained on high-resolution numerical grids and show good agreement with data obtained from direct simulation methods. A reduced-order procedure is also described for calculating the implicitly defined first-order slip boundary conditions prior to the solution of the full equations. This method can be used to generate accurate initial guesses for an iterative solution. The comparative utility of second-order boundary conditions is explored and alternatives discussed.