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A comparative study on the structural integrity of single and double side skin bulk carriers under collision damage

Ozguc, Ozgur and Das, Purnendu and Barltrop, Nigel (2006) A comparative study on the structural integrity of single and double side skin bulk carriers under collision damage. Marine Structures, 18 (7-8). pp. 511-547. ISSN 0951-8339

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Abstract

The primary aim of the present study is to investigate the collision resistance and residual strength of single side skin (SSS) and double side skin (DSS) bulk carriers subject to collision damage. The impact dynamics analyses were conducted using ANSYS LS-DYNA for the evaluation resistance forces, energy absorption and penetration depth for various collision scenarios. The struck vessels of Capsize SSS and DSS designs were assumed to be entirely standstill and the striking vessels of an Aframax-type oil tanker with different bulbous bow shapes were modeled as rigid bodies. The findings were compared, where possible, with existing analytical tools. Residual strength calculations on SSS and DSS vessels were computed corresponding to all considered collision damage scenarios. Traditional Smith's method was applied with the average stress - average strain relationships of elements based on derived semi - analytically. The effect of corrosion was also evaluated by Joint Bulker Project (JBP) Rules on the influence of plate and stiffener thickness. The safety of the vessels was determined as a ratio of the ultimate hull girder strength to bending moment in damaged condition. Finally, results and insights derived from the present work are summarized.