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More than a feeling : using hotel room attendants to improve understanding of job quality

Knox, Angela and Warhurst, Chris and Nickson, Dennis and Dutton, Eli (2015) More than a feeling : using hotel room attendants to improve understanding of job quality. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 26 (12). pp. 1547-1567. ISSN 0958-5192

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Abstract

Recent research by Adler and Adler reveals contradictory claims about the job quality of hotel room attendants; suggesting that an objectively ‘bad’ job can be perceived as subjectively ‘good’ by workers. This contradiction resonates with wider issues about how job quality is conceived – objectively and/or subjectively. Drawing on empirical research of room attendant jobs in upper market hotels in three cities in the UK and Australia, this paper addresses the contradiction by examining both the objective and subjective dimensions of job quality for room attendants. In doing so it refines Adler and Adler's work, constructs a new typology of workers and a new categorisation of job quality informed by workers characteristics and preferences. This categorisation improves conceptual understanding of job quality by enjoining its objective and subjective dimensions.