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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Does addressing prejudice and discrimination through Holocaust education produce better citizens?

Cowan, Paula and Maitles, Henry (2007) Does addressing prejudice and discrimination through Holocaust education produce better citizens? Educational Review, 59 (2). pp. 115-130. ISSN 0013-1911

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Abstract

Previous research on teaching the Holocaust, primarily case studies in either the primary or the secondary sectors, suggests that Holocaust education can contribute to pupils' citizenship values in a positive way. Yet, in common with other initiatives, this evidence focuses exclusively on the short term impact of Holocaust education. Our ongoing longitudinal research is concerned with both the immediate and longer term effects of Holocaust education on pupils' values and attitudes. Initially focused on primary pupils aged 11-12 years, it has followed them into the first year of secondary to examine whether the general improvements in attitudes found in the first stage of the research has been maintained. Further, we are able to compare their attitudes with pupils in their year who did not study the Holocaust in their primary schools. This article draws conclusions from this study.