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Diffuse reflectance measurement tool for laparoscopic surgery

Giardini, Mario Ettore and Klemm, Annett Birgit and Di Falco, Andrea and Krauss, T.F. (2010) Diffuse reflectance measurement tool for laparoscopic surgery. In: Proceedings of SPIE 7715. Proceedings of SPIE . SPIE. ISBN 9780819481887

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Abstract

Continuous-wave diffuse reflectance or Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) offers the possibility to perform a preliminary screening of tissue for ischemia or other tissue anomalies. A tool for intracavity NIRS measurements during laparoscopic surgery, developed within the framework of the FP7-IP ARAKNES (Array of Robots Augmenting the KiNematics of Endoluminal Surgery) project, is described. It consists of a probe, that is located on the tip of an appropriately shaped laparoscopic manipulator and then applied to the tissue. Such a probe employs an array of incoherent semiconductor light sources (LEDs) frequency-multiplexed on a single detector using a lock-in technique. The resulting overall tool structure is simple and compact, and allows efficient coupling of the emitted light towards the tissue. The tool has high responsivity and enables fast and accurate measurements. A dataset gathered from in-vivo tissue is presented. The performance both indicates direct applicability of the tool to significant surgical issues (ischemia detection), and clearly indicates the possibility of further miniaturizing the probe head towards catheterized approaches.