Picture of Open Access badges

Discover Open Access research at Strathprints

It's International Open Access Week, 24-30 October 2016. This year's theme is "Open in Action" and is all about taking meaningful steps towards opening up research and scholarship. The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Explore recent world leading Open Access research content by University of Strathclyde researchers and see how Strathclyde researchers are committing to putting "Open in Action".


Image: h_pampel, CC-BY

Development of a novel UV indicator and dosimeter film

Mills, Andrew and Lee, Soo-Keun and Sheridan, Martin (2005) Development of a novel UV indicator and dosimeter film. Analyst, 130 (7). pp. 1046-1051. ISSN 0003-2654

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)


A novel UV indicator is described, comprising nanocrystalline particles of titania dispersed in a film of a polymer, hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC), containing: a mild reducing agent, triethanolamine (TEOA) and a redox indicator, methylene blue (MB). The UV indicator film is blue-coloured in the absence of UV light and loses colour upon exposure to UV light, attaining within a few min a steady-state degree of bleaching that can provide a measure of the irradiance of the incident light. The original blue colour of the film returns once the source of UV light is removed. The spectral characteristics of a typical UV indicator film, and its components, are discussed and the UV-absorbing action of the titania particles highlighted. From the measured %bleaching undergone by a typical UV indicator as a function of light irradiance the indicator appears fully bleached, within 7 min, by a UV irradiance of 3 mW cm-2 or greater. The mechanism by which the UV indicator works is described. The reversible nature of the UV indicator is removed by covering a typical UV indicator with a thin, largely oxygen impermeable, polymer film, such as the regenerated cellulose found in Sellotape. The product is a UV dosimeter, the response of which is related to the intensity and duration of the incident UV light, as well as the amount of titania in the film. A typical UV dosimeter film is fully bleached by 250 mJ cm-2 of UV light. The possible use of these novel indicators to measure UV exposure levels, irradiance and dose, is discussed.