Picture of wind turbine against blue sky

Open Access research with a real impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within Strathclyde's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is producing Open Access research that can help society deploy and optimise renewable energy systems, such as wind turbine technology.

Explore wind turbine research in Strathprints

Explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research content

Beyond classical meta-analysis: can inadequately reported studies be included?

Robertson, C. and Nik Idris, N.R. and Boyle, P. (2004) Beyond classical meta-analysis: can inadequately reported studies be included? Drug Discovery Today, 9 (21). pp. 924-931. ISSN 1359-6446

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Classical meta-analysis requires the same data from each clinical trial, thus data-reporting must be of a high-quality. Imputation methods are used to include studies that provide incomplete information on variability and the fixed and random effects of a drug. Regression models can be used to include studies other than randomized placebo-controlled studies. In the example outlined here, the use of non-randomized single-arm studies and studies against comparator treatments has little influence on the estimation of the treatment effect in comparison with placebo, an effect that is based on the randomized placebo-controlled studies. The inclusion of other studies serves to increase the precision of the effect of the treatment compared with baseline. Although multiple imputation techniques enable a larger number of studies to be included, which will typically increase the precision of the estimated effect, a careful sensitivity analysis is also required.