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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Animal growth promoters: to ban or not to ban? A risk assessment approach

Kelly, L.A. and Smith, D.L. and Snary, E.L. and Johnson, J.A. and Harris, A.D. and Wooldridge, M. and Morris, J.G. (2004) Animal growth promoters: to ban or not to ban? A risk assessment approach. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 24 (3). pp. 205-212. ISSN 0924-8579

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Abstract

The use of antibiotics for animal growth promotion has been controversial because of the potential transfer of antibiotic resistance from animals to humans. Such transfer could have severe public health implications in that treatment failures could result. We have followed a risk assessment approach to evaluate policy options for the streptogramin-class of antibiotics: virginiamycin, an animal growth promoter, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, a antibiotic used in humans. Under the assumption that resistance transfer is possible, models project a wide range of outcomes depending mainly on the basic reproductive number (R0) that determines the potential for person-to-person transmission. Counter-intuitively, the benefits of a ban on virginiamycin were highest for intermediate values of R0, and lower for extremely high or low values of R0.