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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Light-driven oxygen scavenging by titania/polymer nanocomposite films

Xiao, L. and Green, A.N.M. and Haque, S.A. and Mills, A. and Durrant, J.R. (2004) Light-driven oxygen scavenging by titania/polymer nanocomposite films. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 162 (2-3). pp. 253-259. ISSN 1010-6030

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Abstract

We demonstrate that UV illumination of nanocrystalline TiO2 films in the presence of excess organic hole scavengers can result in the deoxygenation of a closed environment. The kinetics of deoxygenation are investigated under continuous UV illumination as a function of film preparation and hole scavenger employed. Optimum deoxygenation is observed using methanol as a hole scavenger, although efficient deoxygenation is also observed for a range of different polymer/TiO2 nanocomposite films deposited on glass and plastic substrates. Transient absorption spectroscopy is used to probe the kinetics of the deoxygenation reaction, focusing on the kinetics of the reduction of oxygen by photogenerated TiO2 electrons. Under aerobic conditions, this oxygen reduction reaction is observed to exhibit first order kinetics with a rate constant of 70 s(-1), more than one order of magnitude faster than alternative reaction pathways for the photogenerated electrons. These observations are discussed in terms of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation for photocatalytic action.