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Wave height forecasting to improve off-shore access and maintenance scheduling

Dinwoodie, I. and Catterson, V. M. and McMillan, D. (2013) Wave height forecasting to improve off-shore access and maintenance scheduling. In: 2013 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, 2013-07-21 - 2013-07-25.

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Abstract

This paper presents research into modelling and predicting wave heights based on historical data. Wave height is one of the key criteria for allowing access to off-shore wind turbines for maintenance. Better tools for predicting wave height will allow more accurate identification of suitable “weather windows” in which access vessels can be dispatched to site. This in turn improves the ability to schedule maintenance, reducing costs related to vessel dispatch and recall due to unexpected wave patterns. The paper outlines the data available for wave height modelling. Through data mining, different modelling approaches are identified and compared. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and their accuracies for a given site implementation, are discussed.