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An empirical study of the repatriation of female managers: an emerging issue for European multinationals

Scullion, Hugh and Linehan, Margaret (2002) An empirical study of the repatriation of female managers: an emerging issue for European multinationals. Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship, 7 (1). pp. 84-97. ISSN 1077-1158

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Abstract

In recent years, researchers have paid considerable attention to the issues of adjustment to international assignments, while comparatively little research activity has been paid to the topic of repatriation. Despite the growth in numbers of women in international management, very few studies have been conducted outside North America on the topic of repatriation of female corporate executives. This paper reports on the experiences of re-entry to home organizations and home countries by an exclusively senior sample of female international managers based in western Europe. The findings establish that the repatriation stage of an international career move may be even more stressful than expatriation. The findings also establish that female international managers experience more difficulties than their male counterparts because of their pioneering roles. The paper suggests that home-based mentors and access to networks while abroad are important factors in contributing to the successful repatriation of international managers.