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Location and product bundling in the provision of WiFi networks

Efimov, A. and Whalley, J.L. (2004) Location and product bundling in the provision of WiFi networks. Communications and Strategies, 53. pp. 125-135. ISSN 1157-8637

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Abstract

WiFi promises to revolutionise how and where we access the internet. As WiFi networks are rolled out around the globe, access to the internet will no longer be through fixed networks or unsatisfactory mobile phone connections. Instead access will be through low cost wireless networks at speeds of up to 11Mbps. It is hard not to be impressed by the enthusiasm with which WiFi has been embraced. GREEN, ROSENBUSH, CROKETT and HOLMES (2003) assert that WiFi is a disruptive technology akin to telephones in the 1920s and network computers in the 1990s. WiFi is seen as both an opportunity in its own right, as well as an enabler of opportunities for others. Computer manufacturers are hoping that WiFi will increases sales of their laptops, whilst Microsoft feels that WiFi will result in users upgrading their operating systems to Windows XP. This paper seeks to understand why three companies have sought to provide WiFi.