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The Clinical Biomechanics Award 1988 Flexible goniometer computer system for the assessment of hip function

Rowe, Philip and Nicol, Alexander and Kelly, I G (1989) The Clinical Biomechanics Award 1988 Flexible goniometer computer system for the assessment of hip function. Clinical Biomechanics, 4 (2). pp. 68-72. ISSN 0268-0033

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Abstract

A new computer-based system has been developed to assess function in a clinical environment. Flexible electrogoniometers were used to record the motion of both hips and both knees in total hip replacement patients. Foot switches and instrumented walking aids were also incorporated, together with a fixed length timing facility for the derivation of walking velocity, stride length and cadence. The data can be presented on the computer screen immediately following the walking test in the form of angle/time or angle/angle graphs. This facility enables clinicians to study asymmetry and other abnormalities during the clinic session. A summary version of the data can thereafter be generated and included in the patient's notes. A total of 65 patients have been assessed prior to hip replacement and at 2, 6 and 12 months post-operatively. Following surgery, the patients exhibited significant improvments in range of motion, gait velocity and cadence but at 12 months post-operatively their functional performance was restricted compared to data collected for the normal subjects