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Assessment of water quality modelling capabilities of EPANET multi-species and pressure dependent extension models

Seyoum, Alemtsehay G. and Tanyimboh, Tiku T. and Siew, Calvin (2013) Assessment of water quality modelling capabilities of EPANET multi-species and pressure dependent extension models. Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, 13 (4). pp. 1161-1166. ISSN 1606-9749

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The need for accurately predicting water quality through models has increasingly been crucial in meeting rigorous standards and customer expectations. There are several endeavours on developing robust water quality models for water distribution systems. In this paper, two variants of the EPANET 2 water quality model have been assessed to inform future research. The models are the multiple species extension EPANET-MSX and the pressure-dependent extension EPANET-PDX. Water quality analysis was conducted on a hypothetical network considering various operating pressure conditions. Different kinetic models were employed to simulate water quality. First order, limited first order and zero order models were used for predicting chlorine residual, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and water age respectively. Generally, EPANET-MSX and EPANET-PDX provided identical water quality results for normal operating conditions with adequate pressure but different results for pressure-deficient networks. Also, a parallel first order model with fast and slow reacting components was used for chlorine decay and DBPs using the EPANET-MSX model for a network operating under normal pressure conditions.