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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Selectively filtering image features using a percentage occupancy hit-or-miss transform

Murray, Paul and Marshall, Stephen (2012) Selectively filtering image features using a percentage occupancy hit-or-miss transform. In: IET Image Processing Conference 2012, 2012-07-03 - 2012-07-04.

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Abstract

The Hit-or-Miss Transform (HMT) is a well known morphological transform which can be used for template matching and other applications. Recent developments in this area include extensions of the HMT which have employed a variety of techniques in order to improve the noise robustness of the transform. Rank order filters feature heavily in these approaches, and recently, a novel design tool, known as a PO plot, has been introduced. This tool can be used to determine the optimum rank parameter when using these extensions of the HMT to locate features in noisy data. In this paper, the properties of the PO plot are exploited in such a way that an extension of the HMT, known as a POHMT, can be used as a discriminatory filter which selectively marks or discards features in an image. This paper summarises the POHMT, and the PO plot, before demonstrating how these can be used to implement a discriminatory filter. This filter is then shown to produce promising results when applied to the problem of selectively detecting dice in images.