Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Muscle and bone adaptations after treadmill training in incomplete spinal cord injury : a case study using peripheral quantitative computed tomography

Coupaud, Sylvie and Jack, Lindsay and Hunt, Kenneth and McLean, Alan and Allan, David (2009) Muscle and bone adaptations after treadmill training in incomplete spinal cord injury : a case study using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions, 9 (4). pp. 288-297. ISSN 1108-7161

[img] PDF
12COUPAUD.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (231kB)

Abstract

We describe the use of peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) to identify musculoskeletal responses to partial body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) in incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Long-term health consequences of SCI include extensive muscle atrophy, severe bone loss and an increased fracture risk in the affected limbs, mostly at both tibial epiphyses and the distal femoral epiphysis. Regular treadmill training may slow or reverse bone loss by recruiting available lower-limb musculature and loading the leg bones dynamically. The potential for detailed analysis of musculoskeletal changes using pQCT is illustrated with a single case study (14.5 years post-SCI), who completed seven months of partial BWSTT. Pre- and post-training lower-limb pQCT scans were taken to quantify changes in trabecular bone, cortical bone, and soft-tissue. Trabecular bone mineral density increased by 5% ( right) and 20% (left) in the distal tibia. Changes in proximal tibia and distal femur were negligible. Increases in muscle cross-sectional area were 6% (right) and 12% (left) in the lower leg, 7% (right) and 5% (left) in the thigh. We suggest that treadmill training may lead to positive musculoskeletal adaptations at clinically-relevant sites. Such changes can be measured in detail using pQCT.