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World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and adiposity in English children

Basterfield, Laura and Pearce, Mark and Adamson, Ashley and Frary, Jessica and Parkinson, Kathryn and Wright, Charlotte and Reilly, John J (2012) Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and adiposity in English children. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42 (5). pp. 445-451. ISSN 0749-3797

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Abstract

The importance of variation in total volume of physical activity or moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) to development of body fatness in childhood is unclear, and it is unclear if physical activity has a greater influence on adiposity in boys than girls. To assess relationships between 2-year changes in objectively measured physical activity, sedentary behavior, and adiposity in English children. Prospective cohort study, set in Northeast England, of a socioeconomically representative sample of 403 children. Measures were change in accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary behavior from age 7 to 9 years (data collected 2006/2007 and 2008/2009; analyzed in 2010) and concurrent change in adiposity (fat mass index derived from bioelectric impedance) and change in BMI Z-score. Decline in MVPA was associated with a greater increase in fat mass index in boys but not girls. Declining MVPA was associated with increased BMI Z-score in boys but not girls. Increased sedentary behavior was not associated with increased BMI Z-score in either gender. Avoiding mid–late childhood reductions in MVPA may reduce excessive fat gain, although such strategies may have greater impact on boys than girls.