Picture of Open Access badges

Discover Open Access research at Strathprints

It's International Open Access Week, 24-30 October 2016. This year's theme is "Open in Action" and is all about taking meaningful steps towards opening up research and scholarship. The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Explore recent world leading Open Access research content by University of Strathclyde researchers and see how Strathclyde researchers are committing to putting "Open in Action".


Image: h_pampel, CC-BY

A novel approach to modelling and simulating the contact behaviour between a human hand model and a deformable object

Chamoret, D and Roth, S and Feng, Z.-Q and Yan, Xiu and Gomes, S and Peyraut, F (2012) A novel approach to modelling and simulating the contact behaviour between a human hand model and a deformable object. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, 16 (2). pp. 130-140. ISSN 1025-5842

PDF (A novel approach to modelling and simulating the contact)
Manuscript_ID_GCMB_2011_0034.pdf - Preprint

Download (967kB) | Preview


A deeper understanding of biomechanical behaviour of human hands becomes fundamental for any human hand-operated Q2 activities. The integration of biomechanical knowledge of human hands into product design process starts to play an increasingly important role in developing an ergonomic product-to-user interface for products and systems requiring high level of comfortable and responsive interactions. Generation of such precise and dynamic models can provide scientific evaluation tools to support product and system development through simulation. This type of support is urgently required in many applications such as hand skill training for surgical operations, ergonomic study of a product or system developed and so forth. The aim of this work is to study the contact behaviour between the operators’ hand and a hand-held tool or other similar contacts, by developing a novel and precise nonlinear 3D finite element model of the hand and by investigating the contact behaviour through simulation. The contact behaviour is externalised by solving the problem using the bi-potential method. The human body’s biomechanical characteristics, such as hand deformity and structural behaviour, have been fully modelled by implementing anisotropic hyperelastic laws. A case study is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the approach