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Motor activity at age one year does not predict ADHD at seven years

Johnson, Paul and Ahamat, Boolang and McConnachie, Alex and Puckering, Christine and Marwick, Helen and Furnival, Daniel and Marwick, Robbie and Gillberg, Christopher and Heron, Jon and Wilson, Philip (2014) Motor activity at age one year does not predict ADHD at seven years. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 23 (1). pp. 9-18. ISSN 1049-8931

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Abstract

Early identification of psychopathology is a prerequisite for early intervention in treatable disorders such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that can persist and cause significant morbidity. We have examined the predictive utility of motor activity in infancy towards diagnosis of ADHD in later childhood. We conducted a nested case-control study using videos of infants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a longitudinal community-based cohort. Ten percent of children from the cohort took part in a video-recorded interaction at one year. The 60 videos of children who received any Development and Well Being Assessment (DAWBA) psychiatric diagnosis at age 91 months (including 16 with ADHD), together with two randomly selected sex-matched controls per case were selected for motion data analysis. Body movements were measured at age 1 year and three motor activity-derived variables were generated using factor analysis. Associations between these motor activity factors later ADHD diagnoses were sought. No significant association was found between motor activity at age 1 year and diagnosis of ADHD at age 7 years in the full sample. A positive association between motor activity and inattentive ADHD was found in males. In our sample, motor activity at age one year did not predict ADHD at age seven years. The positive association with inattentive ADHD in males requires further investigation.