Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Investigation of water treatment using dielectric barrier discharge

Wang, Tao and Zhao, Yiyi and MacLean, Michelle and MacGregor, Scott and Huang, Guangming and Wilson, Mark (2012) Investigation of water treatment using dielectric barrier discharge. In: Proceedings of the XIX International Conference on Gas Discharges and Their Applications. High Voltage Engineering, Beijing, pp. 654-657.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The gas discharge was investigated for its degradation of methylene blue in aqueous solutions as an alternative to the advanced oxidation process. This, together with the microbial inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, was used to identify the potential reactive species produced. A tailor-made barrier discharge water reactor was made which incorporated micro-discharges and the gas diffusion technology to enable direct interaction between gas discharge and aqueous solutions. The barrier discharge properties and corresponding ozone production prior to and after exposure to aqueous solutions were investigated. Experimental results indicate that besides ozone, other reactive species were produced and played an important role in methylene blue degradation and E. coli inactivation. Their contribution to the methylene blue degradation increases with solution concentration and could reach more than 50% for a sample concentration of 600 mg/l. Corresponding energy efficiency as high as 0.33 µmol/J was achieved using oxygen as the source gas.