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New evidence on the suggestibility of memory : the role of retrieval-induced forgetting in misinformation effects

Saunders, Jo and MacLeod, Malcolm (2002) New evidence on the suggestibility of memory : the role of retrieval-induced forgetting in misinformation effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 8 (2). pp. 127-142. ISSN 1076-898X

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Abstract

Extending recent work that has demonstrated that the act of remembering can result in the inhibition of related items in memory, the present research examined whether retrieval-induced forgetting could provide a mechanism for explaining misinformation effects. Specifically, the authors found in their first study that the inhibition of critical items rendered the recollection of postevent information more likely in a subsequent test of memory. The authors established in their second study that when guided retrieval practice and final recall tests were separated by 24 hr, retrieval-induced forgetting failed to emerge and misinformation effects were absent. In contrast, a delay of 24 hr between initial encoding and guided retrieval practice produced not only retrieval-induced forgetting but also misinformation effects.