Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Simulating the bone-titanium interfacial changes around transfemoral osseointegrated implants using physical models and modal analysis

Cairns, Nicola and Pearcy, Mark and Smeathers, James and Adam, Clayton (2012) Simulating the bone-titanium interfacial changes around transfemoral osseointegrated implants using physical models and modal analysis. In: The International Workshop on Innovative Simulation for Healthcare, 2012-09-19 - 2012-09-21.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Non-invasive vibration analysis is being considered as a method to monitor the healing progression of femoral implants in transfemoral amputees. Studies to date have successfully detected gross alterations in the physical properties of the interface region of physical bone-implant models using vibration techniques. This paper describes the development of a series of physical models which simulate the incremental bone-implant interfacial changes during progressive osseointegration. The capability of modal analysis to detect the changing interface conditions is investigated. The model resonant frequencies and their mode shapes altered due to the different interface conditions. Higher resonances were shown to be more sensitive to interface changes than the fundamental frequency. The findings demonstrate the potential of modal analysis for this application and the technique warrants further investigation.