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Service science, future concerns

Shafti, Farhad and Felice, Maria and Van Der Meer, Robert and Bititci, Umit (2011) Service science, future concerns. In: ACSS 2011 - The Second Asian Conference on the Social Sciences, 2011-06-02 - 2011-06-05. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The paper provides a critical review on the subject of Service, followed by recommendations to review and revise the concept and its associated movements in academia and industry. Service Science or SSME, promoted by the IBM, is now becoming a serious research and teaching agenda in many academic institutes and industrial research centres and is viewed as the future of teaching and research in the area of service. The main idea of Service Science is to adopt an interdisciplinary approach in teaching, research and management of service/services. While there is no doubt that the main idea behind Service Science is a beneficial one, it is not clear how and to what extent its specific features apply to different types of services. In terms of teaching, there seems to be some significant disagreements among academia about how to adopt the concept. The aim of the paper is to illustrate, through a number of conceptual models, the divergence and variety of understandings and perceptions about the concept itself, and its associated academic and practical issues. The areas of disagreement, less defined concepts and uncertainties about approaching the idea are discussed. The ultimate objective of the paper is to identify the areas of concern in Service Science, as a movement, and to present recommendations to study these areas. Main issues to be discussed are the title of Service Science itself, its definitions, scope, content, applicability in different services stake holders and sought outcomes, including the concept of T shape people.