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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Evaluation of modal analysis techniques using physical models to detect osseointegration of implants in transfemoral amputees

Cairns, Nicola Jeanne and Adam, Clayton and Pearcy, Mark["lib/metafield:join_name.last" not defined]Smeathers, James (2011) Evaluation of modal analysis techniques using physical models to detect osseointegration of implants in transfemoral amputees. In: 2011 annual international conference of the IEEE engineering in medicine and biology society, EMBC. IEEE, New York, pp. 1600-1603. ISBN 9781424441211

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Abstract

Non-invasive vibration analysis has been used extensively to monitor the progression of dental implant healing and stabilization. It is now being considered as a method to monitor femoral implants in transfemoral amputees. This paper evaluates two modal analysis excitation methods and investigates their capabilities in detecting changes at the interface between the implant and the bone that occur during osseointegration. Excitation of bone-implant physical models with the electromagnetic shaker provided higher coherence values and a greater number of modes over the same frequency range when compared to the impact hammer. Differences were detected in the natural frequencies and fundamental mode shape of the model when the fit of the implant was altered in the bone. The ability to detect changes in the model dynamic properties demonstrates the potential of modal analysis in this application and warrants further investigation.