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Encapsulation of water insoluble drugs in mesoporous silica nanoparticles using supercritical carbon dioxide

Patil, A and Chirmade, U.N. and Trivedi, V and Lamprou, Dimitrios and Urquhart, Andrew and Douroumis, D. (2011) Encapsulation of water insoluble drugs in mesoporous silica nanoparticles using supercritical carbon dioxide. Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology, 2 (3). ISSN 2157-7439

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Abstract

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles MCM – 41 were synthesized with two dimensional hexagonal p6mm symmetry, high specific surface area(~ 980m2/g) narrow pore size and an average particle size of 186 nm. The produced nanoparticles were used to encapsulate carbamazepine through a supercritical carbon dioxide process combined with various organic solvents. Supercritical processing was found to provide increased drug encapsulation. The loaded MCM - 41 nanoparticles were analyzed using X–ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the crystalline state of the encapsulated carbamazepine and it was found to be dependent on the nature of the organic solvent. Carbamazepine showed increased dissolution rates under sink conditions. Viability studies of Caco – 2 cells demonstrated negligible cytotoxicity for the MCM–41 nanoparticles.