Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Acute renal toxicity and its detection by the Yellow card reporting scheme

Davidson, K. and Kerr, S. and Kinnear, Moira and Bateman, D.N. (2012) Acute renal toxicity and its detection by the Yellow card reporting scheme. Clinical Pharmacist, 4 (April ). S11-S12. ISSN 1758-9061

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Paper presented at the United Kingdom Clinical Pharmacy Association (UKCPA) autumn symposium, Hinckley, 18-20 Nov 2011 (Oral Communication OC 4). The aim of this study was to describe frequency and profile of reporters of yellow card (YC) reports for renal toxicities in Scotland and the UK, and to identify which drugs are reported and at what frequency and to identify risk factors for drug induced renal toxicity. Data were obtained through a retrospective analysis of the UK YC database from 2002 to 2006 using specified renal urinary Medical Dictionary of Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) terms to identify relevant yellow card reports. In the UK, 1484 (2.2%) yellow cards were received by the MHRA for the specified MedDRA terms compared to 152 (2.4%) for Scotland. In each case, the top three drug classes implicated were NSAIDs, drugs affecting the renin-angiotensin system and lipid-lowering agents. Comparison of reporting by different healthcare professionals showed a comparable split between GPs, hospital doctors and hospital pharmacists.