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Wavelet transform processing applied to partial discharge evaluation

Bhatti, Shahzad Ahmed (2012) Wavelet transform processing applied to partial discharge evaluation. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 364 (1). ISSN 1742-6588

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Partial Discharge (PD) is characterized by high frequency current pulses that occur in high voltage (HV) electrical equipments originated from gas ionization process when damaged insulation is submitted to high values of electric field [1]. PD monitoring is a useful method of assessing the aging degree of the insulation, manufacturing defects or chemical/mechanical damage. Many sources of noise (e.g. radio transmissions, commutator noise from rotating machines, power electronics switching circuits, corona discharge, etc.) can directly affect the PD estimation. Among the many mathematical techniques that can be applied to de-noise PD signals, the wavelet transform is one of the most powerful. It can simultaneously supply information about the pulse occurrence, time and pulse spectrum, and also de-noise in-field measured PD signals. In this paper is described the application of wavelet transform in the suppression of the main types of noise that can affect the observation and analysis of PD signals in high voltage apparatus. In addition, is presented a study that indicates the appropriated mother-wavelet for this application based on the cross-correlation factor.