Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute care : risk factors and outcome from a multicentre study

Reilly, J. S. and Stewart, S. and Christie, P. and Allardice, G. M. and Stari, T. and Matheson, A. and Masterton, R. and Gould, I. M. and Williams, C. (2012) Universal screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute care : risk factors and outcome from a multicentre study. Journal of Hospital Infection, 80 (1). pp. 31-35. ISSN 0195-6701

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

A Health Technology Assessment (HTA) model on effectiveness of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening in Scotland suggested that universal screening using chromogenic agar was the preferred option in terms of effectiveness and cost. To test the model’s validity through a one-year pilot-study. A large one-year prospective cohort study of MRSA screening was carried out in six acute hospitals in NHS Scotland, incorporating 81,438 admissions. Outcomes (MRSA colonization and infection rates) were subjected to multivariable analyses, and trends before and after implementation of screening were compared. The initial colonization prevalence of 5.5% decreased to 3.5% by month 12 of the study (P < 0.0001). Colonization was associated with the number of admissions per patient, specialty of admission, age, and source of admission (home, other hospital or care home). Around 2% of all admissions with no prior history of MRSA infection or colonization tested positive. Those who were screen positive on admission and not previously known positive were 12 times more likely than those who screened negative to develop infection, increasing to 18 times if they were both screen positive and previously known positive. MRSA infections (7.5 per 1000 inpatient-days overall) also reduced significantly over the study year (P = 0.0209). The risk factors identified for colonization and infection indicate that a universal clinical risk assessment may have a role in MRSA screening.