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New approach to high speed optical code division multiple access networks with multidimensional codes and use of novel all-optical technology

Glesk, I. (2004) New approach to high speed optical code division multiple access networks with multidimensional codes and use of novel all-optical technology. In: Proceedings of SPIE 5945. SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering.. ISBN 0-8194-5951-8

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Abstract

We present the architecture and code design for a highly scalable, 2.5 Gbis per user optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) system. The system is scalable to 100 potential and more than 10 simultaneous users, each with BER of less than 10-9. The system architecture uses a fast frequency-hopping, time-spreading codes. Unlike frequency and phase sensitive coherent OCDMA systems, this architecture utilizes standard on-off keyed optical pulses allocated in the time and wavelength dimensions. This incoherent OCDMA approach is compatible with existing WDM optical networks and utilizes off the shelf components. We discuss the novel optical subsystem designs for encoders and decoders that enable the realization of a highly scalable incoherent OCDMA system with rapid reconfigurability. A detailed analysis of the scalability of the two dimensional code is presented. Broadcast and select network deployment architectures for OCDMA are discussed.