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World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Functionalised nanoparticles and SERS for bioanalysis

Graham, Duncan and Faulds, Karen and Thompson, David and McKenzie, Fiona and Dalton, Colette and Robson, Anna and Stevenson, Ross (2011) Functionalised nanoparticles and SERS for bioanalysis. [Review]

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Abstract

Metallic nanoparticles can be used as materials for a wide variety of purposes including building blocks for nanoassemblies, substrates for enhanced spectroscopies such as fluorescence and Raman and as labels for biomolecules. Here we report how silver and gold nanoparticles can be functionalised with specific biomolecular probes to interact in a specific manner with a target molecule to provide a change in the properties of the nanoparticles which can be measured to indicate the molecular recognition event. Examples of this approach that will be discussed include DNA hybridisation to switch on surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) when a specific target sequence is present, recognition of specific proteins by aptamer functionalised nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance and SERRS and use of nanoparticles functionalised with antibodies to provide a new type of immunoassay. In addition a new use of dip pen nanolithography in producing nanoarrays of biomolecules for detection by SERRS on a structured metal surface will be presented.