Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Mutation in pore domain uncovers cation- and voltage-sensitive recovery from inactivation in KAT1 channel

Moroni, A and Gazzarrini, S and Cerana, R and Colombo, R and Sutter, J U and DiFrancesco, D and Gradmann, D and Thiel, G (2000) Mutation in pore domain uncovers cation- and voltage-sensitive recovery from inactivation in KAT1 channel. Biophysical Journal, 78 (4). pp. 1862-1871. ISSN 0006-3495

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Effects of threonine substitution by glutamine at position 256 in the pore of the KAT1 channel have been investigated by voltage-clamp, using heterologous gene expression in Xenopus oocytes. The major discrepancy in T256Q from the wild-type channel (wt) was cation specific. While K(+) currents were reduced in a largely scalar fashion, the NH(4)(+) current exhibited slow, voltage-dependent inhibition during hyperpolarization. The same effects could be induced in wt, or intensified in T256Q, by addition of the impermeant cation methylammonium (MA(+)) to the bath. This stresses that both the mutation and MA(+) affect a mechanism already present in the wt. Assuming that current inhibition could be described as entry of the channel into an inactive state, we modeled in both wt and in T256Q the relaxation kinetics of the clamp currents by a C-O-I gating scheme, where C (closed) and I (inactivated) are nonconductive states, and O is an open state allowing K(+) and NH(4)(+) passage. The key reaction is the transition I-O. This cation-sensitive transition step ensures release of the channel from the inactive state and is approximately 30 times smaller in T256Q compared to wt. It can be inhibited by external MA(+) and is stimulated strongly by K(+) and weakly by NH(4)(+). This sensitivity of gating to external cations may prevent K(+) leakage from cation-starved cells.