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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

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Measuring temporal self-regulation in children with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Houghton, Stephen and Durkin, Kevin and Ang, Rebecca P. and Taylor, Myra and Brandtman, Mark (2011) Measuring temporal self-regulation in children with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 27 (2). pp. 88-94. ISSN 1015-5759

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Abstract

A new parent report measure entitled the Salience, Organization and Management of Time Scale (SOMTS) that assessed the temporal regulation of children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) in everyday contexts was developed over three phases (item generation, preliminary validation, and factorial structure). Items were compiled from related earlier instruments plus parental interviews, with final selection determined on the basis of item affectivity indices. The final study was, in part, an online study. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analyses from a sample of parents of children with (n = 194) and without (n = 142) AD/HD indicated a three factor structure of the new instrument (Verbalizing temporal structures, Temporal self-regulation, and Conceptualizing and sequencing time). Significant between-group differences revealed children with AD/HD performed worse on all three factors compared to children without AD/HD. The factors exhibited moderate discriminant validity when used individually and excellent discriminant validity when used in combination. The three distinct and reliable factors identified by the new instrument map well onto themes emphasized in a comprehensive theory of AD/HD and the between-group differences are consistent with the theory’s characterization of a developmental delay in sense of time in young people with the disorder.