Picture of virus under microscope

Research under the microscope...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

Explore SIPBS research

Benchmark of experimental techniques for measuring and controlling suction

Tarantino, Alessandro and Gallipoli, D. and Augarde, C.E. and De Gennaro, V. and Gomez, R. and Laloui, L. and Mancuso, C. and El Mountassir, Grainne and Munoz, J. and Pereira, J-M. and Peron, H and Pisoni, G. and Romero, E. and Raveendiraraj, A and Rojas, J.C. and Toll, D.G. and Tombolato, S. and Wheeler, S. (2011) Benchmark of experimental techniques for measuring and controlling suction. Geotechnique, 61 (4). 303 –312. ISSN 0016-8505

[img]
Preview
PDF
Tarantinogeot61_303.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (194kB) | Preview

Abstract

The paper presents a benchmarking study carried out within the MUSE network aimed at comparing different techniques for measurement and control of suction. Techniques tested by the eight MUSE research teams include axis-translation (pressure plate and suction-controlled oedometer), high-capacity tensiometer, and osmotic technique. The soil used in the exercise was a mixture of uniform sand, sodium bentonite (active clay), and kaolinite (non-active clay), which were all commercially available. Samples were prepared by one team and distributed to all other teams. They were normally consolidated from slurry under one-dimensional conditions (consolidometer) to a given vertical stress. The water retention characteristics of the initially saturated specimens were investigated along the main drying path. Specimens were de-saturated by applying suction through the liquid phase when using axis translation technique or osmotic method and de-saturated by air-drying when suction was measured using high-capacity tensiometers. In general, the same technique was tested by at least two teams. The water retention curves obtained using the different techniques are compared and discrepancies are discussed in the paper.