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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Importance of accurate mobility modeling in teletraffic analysis of the mobile environment

Basgeet, D. and Irvine, J. and Munro, A. and Barton, M. (2003) Importance of accurate mobility modeling in teletraffic analysis of the mobile environment. In: The 57th IEEE Semiannual Vehicular Technology Conference, 2003-04-22 - 2003-04-25.

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Abstract

This paper shows the importance of taking into account accurate mobility effects in performance evaluation of key teletraffic metrics of mobile communication networks. To accomplish this task, we introduce a new discrete stochastic node, the Pole of Gravity characterizing the temporal and spatial behavior of mobile users. This novel concept forms the realm of our mobility model termed as Scalable Mobility Model (SMM) and provides a realistic set of Oaths traversed by subscribers on a daily basis by taking into account attraction points, geographical environments, time factor and grouping individual subscribers into specific classes of mobility. Using this Approach, we demonstrate the need and importance of taking mobility-related factors in the analysis of teletraffic issues by investigating the signaling and traffic related parameters such cell residence time and traffic load. Our simulation results include a comparative performance of SMM against the well known random way point model for same performance issues for the City Area of Bristol, UK during the rush and busy hour.