Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

Mechanics of pressure-assisted injection forging of tubular components

Qin, Y. and Ma, Y. and Balendra, R. (2004) Mechanics of pressure-assisted injection forging of tubular components. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part C: Journal of Mechanical Engineering Science, 218 (10). pp. 1195-1212. ISSN 0954-4062

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Manufacture of tubular components by pressure-assisted injection forging has several advantages over other manufacturing processes. The research conducted previously demonstrates the feasibility of using the process to produce thick-walled tubular engineering components. To improve process-analysis efficiency and to promote engineering applications of the process, an analytical algorithm was developed on the basis of a study of the mechanics of the process. Compared with forming experiments and finite element (FE) simulations, the applied-force and stress requirements calculated using the algorithm are sufficiently accurate. Using the analytical algorithm and FE analysis procedure developed, predominant force and stress components of the process were analysed, which resulted in details of the process mechanics. This is useful information for future uses in process design and optimization.