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Interleukin-15 is not required for the induction or maintenance of orally induced peripheral tolerance

Millington, O.R. and Wei, X.Q. and Garside, P. and Mowat, A.M. (2004) Interleukin-15 is not required for the induction or maintenance of orally induced peripheral tolerance. Immunology, 113. pp. 304-309. ISSN 0019-2805

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Abstract

Orally induced tolerance is a physiologically relevant form of peripheral tolerance, which is believed to be important for the prevention of pathological immune responses in the gut. Of several mechanisms proposed to mediate oral tolerance, one that has received much attention recently is the concept of regulatory CD4+ T cells. As recent studies have suggested that interleukin (IL)-15 may be important for the differentiation and maintenance of regulatory CD4+ T cells, we have examined the role of IL-15 in oral tolerance, using a soluble form of the IL-15 receptor (sIL-15R) which blocks the biological effects of IL-15 in vivo. Oral tolerance induced by feeding mice ovalbumin (OVA) in a low-dose regimen believed to induce regulatory T cell activity was not affected by the administration of sIL-15R during either the induction or maintenance phase of tolerance. Thus, oral tolerance does not involve an IL-15-dependent mechanism.