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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Methods for reliability assessment in future power distribution networks

Sun, Y. and Elders, I.M. and Ault, G.W. and McDonald, J.R. (2005) Methods for reliability assessment in future power distribution networks. In: UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Distribution system reliability is an important issue in system planning, operation and maintenance. However, independent or network utility owned distributed energy resources (DER) can lead to both positive and negative impacts on distribution system reliability. Future distribution systems are likely to have many different mixes of DERs. Variable electricity generation sources such as some renewable energy technologies, energy storage devices and demand side management (DSM) will create greater uncertainties in network reliability. New reliability assessment methods are necessary to fully address these uncertainties and to provide an accurate evaluation of reliability for system planning and opera tional purposes. How existing analytical or probabilistic techniques could be adapted to this new challenge is not being researched at present. This paper presents a starting point of planned research in this area of reliability assessment for future distribution systems. The future reliability problem and possible assessment methods are fully discussed. Quantitative case studies are presented to demonstrate the possible application of reliability assessment methods. Conclusions are drawn from the future distribution reliability problem formulation and the case study results.